Assignment 3b: Design Thinking Reflection and Design Principles (Individual)

Value: 20%

Purpose

The purpose of this assignment is to provide you with the opportunity to reflect on the peer feedback provided on your solution to the design challenge and to formulate your own design principles and manifesto to help guide your future practice.

Instructions

For this assignment, you will reflect on the design thinking process that you completed in Assignment 3a: Design Thinking Challenge (Partners). Below is a list of questions to help guide your reflection:

  • What aspects of your solution were well-received by your peers?  Did your peers provide any suggestions for improvement?
  • What do you think is most important to making your idea a success?  Do you have ideas for further refining your solution based upon the feedback you received?
  • What was the most surprising thing you learned through the design thinking process?
  • Which part of the process was most rewarding? Why?
  • Which part of the process was most difficult or frustrating? Why?
  • What parts of the design thinking process are particularly useful or insightful for tackling challenges in your own organizational context?
  • What would you do differently next time?

There are two parts to this final assignment

Part One:

Once you have reflected on the design thinking process, drawing on your readings, experience, and design case, you will develop six to ten design principles to guide design and innovation within your context.  You should include an explanation of each design principle with a rationale and evidence from the literature to support your identified design principles.  Design principles are developed from your unique setting including your beliefs, ideas, readings, resources, prior experiences, etc. Design principles are a valuable tool as they make our thinking visible to ourselves and others and set a sharable roadmap for our thinking.  You might think of design principles as a checklist of concepts, ideas, issues that bring together what you know about teaching, user experiences, technology, and learning that should inform the creation of learning environments (Design Principles FTW, 2020).  For some examples of design principles, see Design Principles FTW, Pearson’s Learning Design Principles, and Design Principles.

Part Two:

In addition, you will also create a manifesto that provides a brief overview of your design principles that can easily be shared with your digital network.  A manifesto is a short document that “manifests” or makes public a set of ideas and goals (Lupton, 2008).  For some examples of design manifesto, see the Open Design Manifesto and Pablo Zarate’s Design Manifesto.  You may want to consider sharing your manifesto as an Open Educational Resource with a Creative Commons license.

Format

Part 1 Design Principles 

Your reflection and design principles could be submitted in written or oral format, OR a combination of the two formats, adhering to the following:

(1) Written format (Max. 1200 words),

(2) Video or audio recording (Max. 15 mins) OR

(3) A combination of written and oral formats (Max. 800 words & Recording of Max. 5 mins)

Part Two Manifesto 

Your manifesto could be created using a variety of formats (i.e. video, audio narration, poster or info-graphic, interactive or multimedia submission, etc.) The submission should be brief (one-page paper, a poster, a slide, short digital clip or recording)

You are expected to adhere to APA standards for citations, formatting, and references and to support your reflection and design principles with appropriate academic literature.

Submission

You will submit Part One design principles to Assignment 3b: Design Thinking Reflection and Design Principles (Individual) Dropbox in Moodle.

You will post your manifesto to your blog.

Grading

This assignment will be marked according to the following rubric:

Course Learning Outcome/Assessment Criteria Excellent
(A+ to A)
Proficient
(A- to B+)
Satisfactory
(B to B-)
Unsatisfactory
(F)
Citation and APA format All citations and APA format are correct. Most citations and APA formatting are correct. Some citations and APA formatting are correct. Citations and APA formatting are not correct.
Style, Grammar, Spelling Written components are clear and effective for potential audiences with minimal errors in grammar, spelling, mechanics, and punctuation.  Paragraphs are well-organized and adhere to proper academic paragraphing structure. Written components are and effective for the potential audiences, for the most part, with minor errors in grammar, spelling, mechanics, and punctuation.  Paragraphs are fairly organized and mostly adhere to proper academic paragraphing structure. Written components are unclear and/or ineffective for potential audiences with multiple errors in grammar, spelling, mechanics, and punctuation.  Paragraphs somewhat adhere to proper academic paragraphing structure. Written components are and ineffective for potential audiences with significant and repeated patterns of errors in grammar, spelling, mechanics, and punctuation.  Paragraphs do not adhere to proper academic paragraphing structure.
Part One Design Principles

Clearly and articulately reflects on the design thinking process and addresses the feedback to inform future iterations.

Demonstrates personalization of, the theories, concepts, and/or strategies presented in the course materials to date.

Viewpoints and interpretations are insightful and well supported.

Reflects on the design thinking process and there is some engagement with the feedback.

Demonstrates the personalization of a few of the theories, concepts, and/or strategies presented in the course materials to date.

Viewpoints and interpretations are supported.

Includes some reflection of the design thinking process and there is limited discussion of the feedback.

Demonstrates minimal personalization of, the theories, concepts, and/or strategies presented in the course materials to date.

Viewpoints and interpretations are unsupported or supported with flawed arguments.

The design thinking process is minimally reflected on and there is no discussion of the feedback.

Demonstrates a lack of personalization of, the theories, concepts, and/or strategies presented in the course materials to date.

Viewpoints and interpretations are missing, inappropriate, and/or unsupported.

Part One Design Principles Clearly explains the design principles and presents a detailed, realistic, and appropriate rationale with strong arguments and well-documented evidence. Explains the design principles and presents an adequate rationale with logical arguments and documented evidence. Identifies the design principles with minimal explanation and presents a limited rationale with weak arguments and minimal evidence. The design principles are not identified and/or rationale is insufficient and does not include any supporting arguments or evidence.
Manifesto

The manifesto clearly and thoughtfully synthesizes the design principles and provides strong supporting details and insight for each principle.

 

The manifesto synthesizes the design principles and provides supporting details and insight for each principle.

 

The manifesto somewhat synthesizes the design principles and provides a few supporting details and insight for each principle.

The manifesto does not effectively synthesize the design principles and provides limited supporting details and insight for each principle.

 

References

Design Principles FTW. (2020). What are Design Principles anyway? https://www.designprinciplesftw.com/what-are-design-principles

Lupton, E., & Lupton, J. (2008). Manifesto Mania. AIGA – The Professional Association for Design. https://www.aiga.org/manifesto-mania