by Deborah Zornes.  

Good morning. Thank you to everyone that has posted draft research questions and I hope the feedback has been useful. I've had a couple of questions around the relationship between the lit review for the proposal (A2) and the actual research that's done in 691 and 691 which will be either a meta synthesis methodology for those in 691 or a modified action research methodology for those in 692.

For the proposal in 622 you are looking at the broader topic of your research, you're not looking to answer your research question. You are providing that high level overview and synthesis of what's been done in this area, and what gaps there might be.

If you were doing primary research you'd then be out gathering data - interviews, documents, etc. - and then doing that deep level analysis including coding, memoing, and what ever other techniques to then explore and understand and make sense of all that data. Because you are doing secondary research, the difference is only in the type of data that you are gathering -- instead of a number of interview texts for example, you'll have a number of journal articles, or book chapters, or documents. But the process then of taking those apart, of sorting, of coding, of analyzing and making sense of that data is the same as if you were doing primary research.  In the lit review for the proposal you are searching google scholar and other repositories for information around your topic, reading and summarizing. As part of the methods assignment (A3) you'll outline a clear approach to how you will gather data for the research -- you'll identify specific search terms and look at developing inclusion and exclusion criteria -- we don't do that for the lit review for  A2.

In the lit review for the proposal, you are focused more on a general summation and synthesis of what you believe the reader should know and understand about this area -- when you do the research you are exploring those gaps, you are looking at how better to understand and explain the answers to your questions.  They are two very different processes.

Where it gets a bit more grey is that sometimes you will come across something in the data analysis that you believe should be or should have been part of the lit review background for the proposal, and similarly, you may come across something in the data that provides more information and detail about an aspect you touched on in the lit review for the proposal. It's okay to shift between the two -- it doesn't happen often, but it does happen, especially with additional information going into the lit review.

Again though, what you need to look at in terms of those decisions is whether something is a background, higher level, information piece to set the stage for the research, or whether it is data to be analyzed using those specific methods around themes, coding, memoing, etc.

I hope that helps for those that may be wondering about the difference between A2 and between the research that happens in 691 and 692.

As always, don't hesitate to reach out with any questions.

Take care

Deb

by Deborah Zornes.  

Good morning. Thank you to everyone that has posted draft research questions and I hope the feedback has been useful. I've had a couple of questions around the relationship between the lit review for the proposal (A2) and the actual research that's done in 691 and 691 which will be either a meta synthesis methodology for those in 691 or a modified action research methodology for those in 692.

For the proposal in 622 you are looking at the broader topic of your research, you're not looking to answer your research question. You are providing that high level overview and synthesis of what's been done in this area, and what gaps there might be.

If you were doing primary research you'd then be out gathering data - interviews, documents, etc. - and then doing that deep level analysis including coding, memoing, and what ever other techniques to then explore and understand and make sense of all that data. Because you are doing secondary research, the difference is only in the type of data that you are gathering -- instead of a number of interview texts for example, you'll have a number of journal articles, or book chapters, or documents. But the process then of taking those apart, of sorting, of coding, of analyzing and making sense of that data is the same as if you were doing primary research.  In the lit review for the proposal you are searching google scholar and other repositories for information around your topic, reading and summarizing. As part of the methods assignment (A3) you'll outline a clear approach to how you will gather data for the research -- you'll identify specific search terms and look at developing inclusion and exclusion criteria -- we don't do that for the lit review for  A2.

In the lit review for the proposal, you are focused more on a general summation and synthesis of what you believe the reader should know and understand about this area -- when you do the research you are exploring those gaps, you are looking at how better to understand and explain the answers to your questions.  They are two very different processes.

Where it gets a bit more grey is that sometimes you will come across something in the data analysis that you believe should be or should have been part of the lit review background for the proposal, and similarly, you may come across something in the data that provides more information and detail about an aspect you touched on in the lit review for the proposal. It's okay to shift between the two -- it doesn't happen often, but it does happen, especially with additional information going into the lit review.

Again though, what you need to look at in terms of those decisions is whether something is a background, higher level, information piece to set the stage for the research, or whether it is data to be analyzed using those specific methods around themes, coding, memoing, etc.

I hope that helps for those that may be wondering about the difference between A2 and between the research that happens in 691 and 692.

As always, don't hesitate to reach out with any questions.

Take care

Deb